Thursday, February 12, 2009

吴亚鸿《怀古系列》

  

《怀古》 1999 吴亚鸿
           

 

  • 文/钟金钩(马来西亚艺术学院院长

  “怀古系列”作品中,吴亚鸿以小蚂蚁配合古代文字的题材,试图以东方美学结合西方现代构成原理,寻找一个他自己的创作方向。他以腐蚀的古代文字和渲染墨迹来创制肌纹,以软化及破坏彻媛苫平板画面,并在空白的方格内点上纡行的小蚂蚁以产生时间及生命感。

  他说:“在画中,文字是象征文化发展的符号,它不受时空的局限,记载着人类文明的演进。蚂蚁的出现,隐喻着东方文化艺术也能像这个小生命一样顽强,穿越时空,源远流长,生生不息世世相传,”吴亚鸿作品隐喻恰切,意义深厚。
  

Monday, February 2, 2009

Sunday People  Niu strokes

  
By Rachel Philip
  Journalist, The New Straits Times
  

Niu strokes

THE bull is a hardworking creature. Calligraphy master Goh Ah Ang, 55, believes that we should emulate this quality in 2009. “Hard work brings wealth and good fortune,” says Goh who is born in the year of the Horse.

 The principal of Top Art in Klang, Goh began learning calligraphy when he was 13. His 30-year-old art centre currently has about 400 students coming in for classes seven days a week.

 The youngest student is only four while the oldest is 70-something ex-school principal.

 Known internationally as well as locally as the Ant Artist, Goh celebrates the tiny insect in most of his creations, unlike other Chinese artists who portray beasts of power such as tigers and horses in their works.

 “My message is that we should uphold all creatures, says Goh. “There is much we can learn from the hardworking ant. ”

 On the cover of Sunday People today is a calligraphic expression of Niu, the Mandarin word for Ox, by Goh.

 The secret to a robust-looking character: Begin each stroke slightly inside of it, take the brush to the stroke’s intended end, then reverse the brush back into the stroke. When you reach the other end, again reverse your brush back into the stroke. This yields solid-looking tips for each stroke, rather than wimpy, tapered ends.


Watch the video: Learn from the master the four easy brush strokes for “niu” or ox. Go to http://www.nst.com.my/.